Temple Symbols

Temple Symbols

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Last June my mom shared with me a booklet she was putting together for their stake youth conference.  I thought it was awesome and asked if I could share it on my blog.  She sent me the files and it has sat in my inbox for nearly a year waiting for me to post it.  I decided it was finally time for me to get around to posting it.

The booklet was for the youth to be given to conduct a self-guided tour of the temple grounds.  The booklet points out some of the different symbols they would encounter.  My mom was asked to be careful not to give specific meanings for the symbols as symbols can have many layers of interpretation.  If you give someone a concrete “this is what this symbol means” it takes away their opportunity to discover the meaning for themselves and also might remove some of the incentive to try to work out other possible meanings.  So the booklet contains quotes, scriptures and questions which might help people find some interpretations for the symbols.  For me it was really helpful just to have some symbols pointed out as symbols.  For instance, I’d never thought of the fence as being anything more than a fence to even consider that it might have symbolic significance.

This booklet was made specifically for the Los Angeles Temple, but if you go to any temple you will find many of these symbols in other temples.  We tried to go through and make sure there were pictures and information so that if you are unable to go to the Los Angeles temple you can still learn from reading it.  I think anyone who is trying to get more out of the symbolism of the temple can gain some insight from reading this.

Most of the quotes are from General Authorities and can be found at LDS.org, but one article that is referenced a few times is Symbols in Sacred Architecture and Iconongraphy by Camilian Demetrescu from The Institute for Sacred Achitecture.  There are also a couple references from Studies in Biblical and Semitic Symbolism by Maurice H. Farbridge as well as Temples to Dot the Earth by Richard O. Cowan.  These are all excellent resources if you’re looking to deepen your understanding of the symbols found in the temple.

You are welcome to redistribute this provided you leave the credit on the back cover in tact.  I’m providing several different files to make distribution easy.  First I have the printable files.  The booklet was made to be half pages front and back.  We’ve worked out the pages in order so that you can print the file with the front sides and then the file with the back sides and have it be pretty straightforward.  I’ve also included a pdf with all of the pages in order so that you can easily read it on your computer (or print it whatever other fancy way you’d like).

We would love any feedback on the booklet.  Let us know what symbols you’d missed before or any insights that you’ve gained.  We hope this helps you draw closer to the Savior in your temple worship.

Amish Friendship Bread

Amish Friendship Bread

Amish Friendship Bread Banner

My neighbor brought me an Amish Friendship Bread start and I was able to make some for the first time!  I remember my mom making it once when I was little and I was excited to get to do it myself.  It was a fun thing to do, but when I went to deliver my starts to my friends I realized that my copy of the recipe was all dirty.  I didn’t want to photocopy it in that state, so I did the only logical thing and redesigned it to be cute and prepared it to post on my website 🙂  Hopefully this will save the next people from having to decide between photocopying a dirty recipe and having to recreate the document themselves.  You can get the printable copy here – Amish Friendship Bread Printable.

Also, if you’re like me and got to the last day and discovered that your instant pudding boxes are 3.9oz instead of the 5.1oz called for, I’ve done the math for you so that you can use the right proportion of the 3.9oz boxes.  Just combine 2 3.9oz boxes of pudding and remove a generous 1/3 cup of pudding mix and set aside.  The remainder is what will go with your bread.  If you would like to make pudding from that 1/3 cup of mix (because, pudding is delicious), just mix you 1/3 cup of pudding with 2/3 cup of milk and whisk for 2 minutes.

By the way, if you’re going to make this I HIGHLY recommend using Baking Pam.  I don’t usually splurge on ingredients, but my husband brought this home once after being sent to do the grocery shopping and I gave it a try.  It really is like magic for baking.  Everything I make with the Baking Pam just slides right out of the pan with no fuss whatsoever.  It is one splurge that I feel like is very worthwhile 🙂

Here’s a text copy of the recipe as well if you just want to see what this is all about.  Don’t be scared by the 240 hour prep time… the vast majority of that time is spent with a ziploc bag sitting on your counter!  If you want to print it though, use this version, it’s much prettier!

Amish Friendship Bread
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 2 loaves
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ cup milk
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 5.1oz box instant vanilla pudding, other flavors can be used but not sugar free
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ tsp salt
  • Optional: add nuts, raisins, chocolate chips etc.
Instructions
  1. Day 1: Receive the bread start. Do nothing.
  2. Day 2: Knead the bag
  3. Day 3: Knead the bag
  4. Day 4: Knead the bag
  5. Day 5: Knead the bag
  6. Day 6: Mix 1 cup flour, 1 cup milk, & 1 cup sugar in a bowl. Add to bag. Knead to combine.
  7. Day 7: Knead the bag
  8. Day 8: Knead the bag
  9. Day 9: Knead the bag
  10. Day 10:Combine in a large bowl—batter from the bag, 1 cup milk, 1 cup flour & 1 cup sugar. Combine well and put 1 cup of starter in 4 gallon sized bags. Keep one for yourself. Give this recipe and 1 starter bag to 3 friends
  11. To Make the Bread: Mix 1 tsp cinnamon and ½ cup sugar together, set aside.
  12. Spray 2 smaller bread pans with cooking spray.
  13. Sprinkle the pans with cinnamon and sugar mixture.
  14. Pour batter into pans.
  15. Bake at 325°F for 45-60 minutes.
  16. Let stand for 10 minutes before removing from pans.

Amish Friendship Bread printable recipe here.

Happy Mother’s Day – to Women Without Children

Happy Mother’s Day – to Women Without Children

UnMother's Day

Today as we celebrate Mother’s Day I feel keenly aware of the women within my circle of friends for whom this day is a reminder of the imperfect situations they might find themselves in.  Whether they are unmarried, or struggling with infertility, or single parents, or feeling overwhelmed with too many children, or have wayward children, or children they gave up for adoption, or children who have passed on before them, or those who have lost their own mothers, or don’t have the relationship with their mother’s that they desire.  Mother’s Day can be a difficult day for many people.  About a year ago one of my friends who had struggled with infertility for a long time posted how she would go to Relief Society on Mother’s Day and then go home with the Mother’s Day treat and cry feeling like she’d been given something that she didn’t deserve. This broke my heart to read of how a wonderful day for so many which is a bitter reminder for others of a blessing which they have been denied.

Particularly for those who are struggling with the challenge of not having yearned for children I wanted to share this thought.  When I first discovered my favorite blog, Women in the Scriptures, I went through and read a bunch of her blog posts at once, one of the first posts I read was this one about infertility.  I want to share one particular quote used in that post from Sheri Dew –

” …While we tend to equate motherhood solely with maternity, in the Lord’s language, the word mother has layers of meaning. Of all the words they could have chosen to define her role and her essence, both God the Father and Adam called Eve “the mother of all living”—and they did so before she ever bore a child. Like Eve, our motherhood began before we were born. Just as worthy men were foreordained to hold the priesthood in mortality, righteous women were endowed premortally with the privilege of motherhood. Motherhood is more than bearing children, though it is certainly that. It is the essence of who we are as women. It defines our very identity, our divine stature and nature, and the unique traits our Father gave us…

…Motherhood is not what was left over after our Father blessed His sons with priesthood ordination. It was the most ennobling endowment He could give His daughters, a sacred trust that gave women an unparalleled role in helping His children keep their second estate. As President J. Reuben Clark Jr. declared, motherhood is “as divinely called, as eternally important in its place as the Priesthood itself.” (Are We Not All Mothers, Ensign. Nov. 2001)

I loved this definition of motherhood.  When Eric and I were first married we lived in Wymount and it seemed like a majority of the women in our ward were mothers.  Our plan at the time was to wait to have children until Eric was done with school and I was working full time to support us while we got to that goal.  I felt excluded from the mom club – the circle of women who passed their days in the middle of the quad at the playground chatting.  I remember the first time my visiting teachers came to visit me with their toddlers and in the process of getting to know one another I of course told them that I was working full time.  While they didn’t say anything disparaging about that, I felt very much like they were looking at me with an air of, “Oh, you’re one of those working girls.” (please read that in your head with all the disdain of a 20’s era society woman to a factory woman)  At the time I felt like I had a hard time defining myself.  I’m the oldest of 5 children and my mom has called me the second mother in our home. I grew up carrying around babies, playing with kids, babysitting and loving being around children.  However in that season of my life I was without children – far away from my siblings and not yet having children of my own.  At the same time, I still felt the inherent mother-ness in me.  I had a hard time figuring out how to refer to myself as a married woman without children and would often try to call myself a single mother – which was ironic since I was completely the opposite – but I struggled to find the name for this state that I was in of not being a mother although travelling down that path.  I think I felt similarly displaced to those mothers who find themselves without a father to aid them which is why I would gravitate to that title.  The other title I would come up with was “childless mother” which also felt odd since it seems weird to call someone a mother who doesn’t have her own children.  I certainly struggled with my identity in the context of other women at the time.

In retrospect I think the title of “childless mother” is actually the right term.  Despite not having children, I was a mother.  I liked what Sister Dew stated about our motherhood as women beginning before we were born.  Motherhood is not dependent on 9 months of pregnancy, it is inherent in our calling as women.  Motherhood is the qualities of women that dispose us to teaching, building and growing not only children but the world around us.  You can fulfill that calling as a sister, daughter, aunt, friend, teacher, office worker, CEO, relief society president, yoga instructor or whatever role you find yourself in.  Just as a man is no less a priesthood holder for not being a bishop, women are no less mothers for not having children.  Motherhood is part of who you are.  I know that might not be much consolation to those who would like to discharge that calling in the most conventional way, especially when proffered by one who has been given that more conventional mother role.  However, I hope you know that whatever your contribution to motherhood is I honor you for what you are building and the love you show for those around you.

So take that cookie offered to you in Relief Society with pride, you are a mother.  Happy Mother’s Day, to all women, whatever circumstance you find yourself in.  You are a daughter of God, and we want to celebrate the divinity within you <3

Dinner Chore Chart

Dinner Chore Chart

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For those of you who know me personally this will not come as much of a shock, but here’s my confession for today – I am a terrible housekeeper.  I really do try to keep up with the house but it just doesn’t happen.  I am not someone who enjoys cleaning and trying to keep a house clean that still has three young children in it seems like a near impossible task.  However, I am trying.

My biggest pet peeve is keeping my kitchen clean.  It seems like the most critical room in the house to keep clean but three times a day everything’s being pulled out and despite my best efforts I am rarely on top of it.  The dishes are my greatest nemesis and it’s hard to keep everyone in the kitchen and helping me until the work is done.  So I’ve finally come up with a solution – meet the dinner time chore chart!

It’s really pretty basic, I’ve come up with 5 chores and each person in our  family will be assigned one chore for the week which we will change on Monday nights as part of our Family Home Evening and night time privileges will not be granted until that chore is done.  Anyways, I spent some time creating a cute chart and I wanted to share it with anyone who would like to use it.

All of the artwork came from Susan Fitch and you can find the original files for free on her site here and she graciously agreed to let me share these job charts with my readers using her artwork. You should check out her blog and Etsy shop, she has a lot of great things.  The background papers came from Shabby Princess’ free kit Celebrating.  The fonts are Pea Sweet Caroline and Pea Cookie’s Doodles from Kevin & Amanda’s Fonts for Peas.

Ok, so I have two different files that I’m providing here and you’ll have to decide which one you want.  The simple one is just a PDF which you can print out and write your family member names on the tags and be done.  However, I hate my handwriting, so I’m also providing the original Publisher files so you can customize the tags if you’d like.  To customize the tags you’ll just need to go to the tags pages and change the names to the names of your family members.  For mine I wanted pictures of the family members (since some of my kids are still pre-reading) so there are tags that have blank pictures on them but are formatted nicely.  To swap those out for pictures of your own family members all you have to do is right click on the picture, then find the picture you want to use from your computer.  The new picture will be dropped in to the same formatted space.  To re-center the picture I’ve found that I need to de-select the picture and then re-select it (I don’t know why, I just know that’s what happens) then under the Picture Tools->Format tab select Crop and you can now re-size and move the picture around within the frame.  But don’t worry, there are also simple picture-less tags that I’ve included so you can just fill them in.  You will need to make sure that you have the two fonts that I specified above installed on your computer to have the same result on your computer.  If anyone really really wants I could fill in the tags for you and send you a pdf of just the chart you want and your family’s names and pictures if you want to email me the names and pictures that you want.  You can email me through my contact page and I could provide that for a small fee – but I’d encourage you to be brave!  It’s not too hard!  You can do it!  (Assuming of course that you have a computer that can run Microsoft Publisher, and has it installed)

To create my final chore chart I printed the pages out on regular printer paper and then laminated it.  If you don’t own a laminator I’ve really liked the Purple Cows Hot & Cold Laminator that I have.  I got mine for pretty inexpensive from Costco and I think they have them there pretty regularly, but I’ve found that I can get the laminating pouches for a good deal from Amazon.  One trick I learned early on is that you have to be sure to cut out the little pieces you want to laminate (in this case the name tags) before laminating and then laminate them with enough space around the edges to not break the seal of the lamination.  I then used a bunch of these little sticky magnets on the back of the chore chart and on the back of each name tag.  The magnets aren’t super strong so I put two on each of the name tags and six on the back of the chore chart itself.  For now it’s hanging on my refrigerator but I’m planning on getting one of these magnetic boards from Ikea and hang it on my wall… as soon as I can get the kids in order to go (hahahahahah, yeah right).

Anyways, here are the two files.  Let me know if you like them and get any use out of them in your home!  It always makes me happy when someone finds the resources I post useful 🙂  And of course, don’t steal them and sell them or pass them off as your own.  That’s just not cool guys.  I hope this helps you get your kitchen routine more in order too!

Dinner chore charts – PDF version

Dinner chore charts – Publisher version